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2007 Student Research Grant Recipients

Josh

Josh Beckham

Vanderbilt University

Nashville, TN

Supporting ASLMS Member:

E. Duco Jansen, Ph.D.

Vanderbilt University

Nashville, TN

“Gene Expression Profiling to Assess Thermotolerance to Laser Irradiation”

The general purpose of this research will be to determine which genes are differentially expressed in preconditioning protocols for laser tissue interactions. It is hypothesized that hsp70 is not the sole mediator of thermotolerance in murine cells. Objectives are: (1) Perform microarray gene expression profiling on hsp70 deficient cells and wild type cells 4 hours after mild heat treatment to screen for upregulated and downregulated genes. (2) Choose 2-3 candidate genes from microarray analysis on which to perform real time RT-PCR and, therefore, confirm their relative levels of induction or suppression.

sophie

Sophie Desmons, DDS

Lille University Hospital

Lille, France

Supporting ASLMS Member:

Serge Mordon, Ph.D.

Pavillon Vancostenobel, Lille Univeristy Hospital

Lille, France

“Laser Preconditioning on Bone Vascularization After X-Ray Radiation”

The general purpose of this research will be to determine the effects of a Laser preconditioning on bone vascularization after X-ray radiation. X-ray radiation induces a chronic antiangiogenic effect on bone, affecting healing and remodeling processes. A first longitudinal study aimed to investigate quantitatively the effect of X-ray radiation on the microvasculature in a bony site during 12-week follow up. An in vivo model was designed: an original optical chamber was implanted on the rabbit cranium in order to evaluate the vascularization process on bony site in a reproducible manner. The bone chamber allows an in vivo long term quantitative analysis of the bone’s microcirculation on a single animal. In our study, the observation of the microcirculation in calvarial bone enables us to evaluate the dynamic processes of bone healing.

Sonali

Sonali Mukherjee, B.S.

Wellman Laboratories (MGH)

Boston Veterans Affairs Hospital

Boston, MA

Supporting ASLMS Member:

Zeina Tanous, M.D.

Harvard Medical School

Boston, MA

“Imaging Melanoma Using RFPI”

Reflectance and Fluorescence Polarization Imaging (RFPI) is a new bedside method that successfully uses fluorescent chromophores to image non-melanoma skin cancers. The chromophores used in this study, methylene blue and tetracycline, are selectively retained by oncogenic tissue. These chromophore stained tumors exhibit exogenous fluorescence when exposed to polarized light. This study extends the use of the RFPI technique to imaging melanoma.

Elana

 

Elena Salomatina

Wellman Center for Photomedicine

Massachusetts General Hospital

Boston, MA

Supporting ASLMS Member:

R. Rox Anderson, M.D.

Massachusetts General Hospital

Boston, MA

“Image Fusin for Automated Detection of Skin Cancers”

The immediate goal of this research is to enable optical pathology of nonmelanoma skin cancer. Nonmelanoma skin cancers are more common then all other types of cancers combined. The incidence of these cancers has rapidly increased during past three decades in the USA. Only in clinical practice of our collaborator Dr. Victor Neel (Massachusetts General Hospital) 8 to 10 cases of NMSC are being treated daily. In future, the established procedure of image fusion using the vast amount of collected information on skin structural and spectral appearance can be easily extended to analyze the variety of skin pathological conditions.

 


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